Monday Discovery: “Silence,” an Essay by Laura Furman

Today’s discovery is Silence,” an essay by Laura Furman first printed in the Glimmer Train Bulletin, February 2011.

If you struggle with the noisiness of this busy life, read Furman’s essay. Every word is a treasure. Here’s a tease . . .

A great treasure of vital demands stands between the writer and her work—love, family, the necessities of food and shelter, friends; hardest of all there is her restless, noisy self.

—Laura Furman

Solitude
Son House, Hambidge Center for the Arts 2011 © Gerry Wilson

Worthy Words: A Peculiar Crossroads

The writer operates at a peculiar crossroads where time and place and eternity somehow meet. His problem is to find that location. 

Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964), Mystery and Manners, part 2 (1969).

Railway
Image courtesy of samurai / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How profound is this concept, and how true? 

Flannery O’Connor is one of my favorite writers. A master of the short story, she is famous for blending the gritty and the mysterious into as motley a crew of characters as you’ll ever hope to meet.

If you’ve never read her work, I encourage you to sample her stories. Here’s a link to “A Good Man Is Hard to Find,” which is often anthologized.


Have you experienced moments in your own writing where—somehow—the real and the mysterious come together? Tell me about it in a comment!

Worthy Words: Emotion and Writing

There is a sta­sis, an equi­lib­rium that our bod­ies and minds need to main­tain their func­tion, but as writ­ers we fight against bal­ance, we encour­age any emo­tions that are on the edge. We embrace and har­ness our emo­tions and write about them.

Suzie Gallagher in “Why You Need to Harness Your Sorrow to Write Well,” The Write Practice. Check this article out.

Sunrise from a hospital window