Create/Gerry Wilson
Create/Gerry Wilson

I haven’t shared a Monday Discovery with you in a while. Here’s a quote from “Mantra for the Novelist” by Jael McHenry, debut novelist and contributor at Writer Unboxed. The entire article spoke to me, but these words really hit home:

People who don’t write any better than you do are making money doing what they love. People who made the right connection. People who were in the right place at the right time. Don’t begrudge them their success; they have nothing to do with you. You are your own person, writing your own words, working toward your own goals. Don’t be bitter. Don’t be angry. Be focused. Be self-centered in that good way, in the way that means you are wholly dedicated to perfecting your own craft, executing on your own plans, diligently moving forward, ever forward.

If you are a novelist who has not yet published a book, this inspiring read is for you! Go read it. Now.

Monday Discovery: “Silence,” an Essay by Laura Furman

Today’s discovery is Silence,” an essay by Laura Furman first printed in the Glimmer Train Bulletin, February 2011.

If you struggle with the noisiness of this busy life, read Furman’s essay. Every word is a treasure. Here’s a tease . . .

A great treasure of vital demands stands between the writer and her work—love, family, the necessities of food and shelter, friends; hardest of all there is her restless, noisy self.

—Laura Furman

Solitude
Son House, Hambidge Center for the Arts 2011 © Gerry Wilson

Worthy Words: A Peculiar Crossroads

The writer operates at a peculiar crossroads where time and place and eternity somehow meet. His problem is to find that location. 

Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964), Mystery and Manners, part 2 (1969).

Railway
Image courtesy of samurai / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How profound is this concept, and how true? 

Flannery O’Connor is one of my favorite writers. A master of the short story, she is famous for blending the gritty and the mysterious into as motley a crew of characters as you’ll ever hope to meet.

If you’ve never read her work, I encourage you to sample her stories. Here’s a link to “A Good Man Is Hard to Find,” which is often anthologized.


Have you experienced moments in your own writing where—somehow—the real and the mysterious come together? Tell me about it in a comment!